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Aug
27

What is power play in Cricket and how it use during the play?

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What is power play in Cricket and how it use during the play?

Power Play are using in Cricket ODI what is this and what is the purpose of this power play during the match and how could the captain obtain this power play?

Powerplay maens the fielding restrictions which allow the batsmen to score more runs easily. Fielding restriction means that only 2 players are allowed to field outside the 30 yard circle. Earlier, there was a fielding restriction of 30% of overs of one innings. In a 50 overs match, the fielding restriction was of 15 overs.

Similarly, if a match was reduced to 20 overs, then the fielding restriction was for 6 overs. But nowadays, the restrictions are divided into three parts known as powerplays. The first ten overs are the first powerplay. Then the other two powerplays are of 5 overs each and the fielding captain decides when he wants to have it.

6 Comments

1
usthath@sbcglobal.net
May 7th, 2009 at 12:09 pm

This refers to the new fielding restrictions rule. In the past, there was a 15-over period at the start of an innings when only two fielders were allowed outside the 30-yard circle. This will now apply to the first 10 overs of every innings, in addition to two blocks of five overs (Powerplays), which will be used at the discretion of the fielding captain.
# Powerplay 1 covers the first 10 overs of an innings where the fielding restrictions are exactly the same as per the old ODI rules. Two fielders have to be in close catching position.
# Powerplay 2 represents the first block of five overs. The fielding captain has to decide at which point he wishes to implement this rule. He can implement it at any stage in the match, provided he informs the umpire. Only two fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle and the two close catchers are not mandatory in this case.
# Similarly Powerplay 3 represents the second block of five overs.
# The umpire will signal Powerplay by moving his arm in a circular motion.
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2

only 2 fielder are allowed outside the 3o yard curcle.each powerplay is 5 overs . this give the batmen the opportunity to hit over the top and score boudaries because it easier for them with less fieder outide the ring. it used to be for the first 15 overs
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3

earlier there were fielding restrictions on first 15 overs now by introducing powerplay there are fielding restrictions on first 10 overs and any 10 overs which the captain like introduction of powerplay has reduced the role of bowlers by giving them only little chances it has reduced the beauty of cricket it is signald by showing a T inside a circle by the umpires
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4

Powerplay maens the fielding restrictions which allow the batsmen to score more runs easily.

Fielding restriction means that only 2 players are allowed to field outside the 30 yard circle.

Earlier, there was a fielding restriction of 30% of overs of one innings. In a 50 overs match, the fielding restriction was of 15 overs. Similarly, if a match was reduced to 20 overs, then the fielding restriction was for 6 overs.

But nowadays, the restrictions are divided into three parts known as powerplays. The first ten overs are the first powerplay. Then the other two powerplays are of 5 overs each and the fielding captain decides when he wants to have it.
References :

5

the team should take total 3 power play
power play is —-when 2 fielders can field outside of the 30-yard circle and the other would field in the circle
1st power play—–first 10 over
the 2nd power play is for 5 over, the captain can take it any time after 1st power play
3rd power play is for 5 over, the captain can take it any time after 2nd power play
total 20 overs
understand?
References :

6
sridharthelion
May 7th, 2009 at 2:08 pm

In an effort to keep the game more exciting during the middle overs, this rule was amended to apply only to the first 10 overs of every innings, but also in two blocks of five overs, Powerplays, which will be used at the discretion of the fielding captain.

The first block of 10 overs of an innings is known as Powerplay One. The fielding restrictions during this period are exactly the same as per the old ODI rules with only two players being allowed to stand outside the 30-yard circle and two fielders required to be placed in close catching position.
The first block of five overs chosen at the fielding captain's discretion is known as Powerplay Two. The fielding captain has to decide at which point he wishes to implement this rule. He can only implement it at the beginning of an over, provided he informs the umpire.[1] Again, only two fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle. However there is no mandatory number of close catchers under this power play.
The second block of five overs, with identical parameters to Powerplay Two, is known as Powerplay Three.
When the fielding side's captain informs the umpire that he wishes to enact a powerplay the official will signal as such by moving his arm in a circular motion.
Should the fielding captain choose not to exercise his discretion, the remaining powerplays will automatically commence at the latest available point in the innings (i.e. at the start of the 41st and the 46th overs in an uninterrupted innings).
The Powerplay was intended to add to the excitement in ODI cricket. If the batting team has got off to a very quick start, the fielding captain is likely to choose to delay Powerplay 2 and 3, and instead spread out the field to stem the flow of runs. Powerplays may then be taken when an attacking batsman is out, or when the run rate has been reduced. Otherwise, all 20 Powerplay overs are likely to be taken at the start of the batting team's innings.

The rule was first encountered in the One-day International between England and Australia on 7 July 2005 and was then finalised after a trial period in 2006, unlike the supersub rule which was scrapped after being pioneered at the same time. The rule is included as part of the playing conditions for the 2007 Cricket World Cup.
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